Books

antiracism*

Everyone should be opposed to racism. However, “antiracism” is an Orwellian phrase whose meaning is the exact opposite of how it sounds.

             

To be an “antiracist” you must agree that our society, in every aspect, is racist and that the remedy is to embrace sweeping new forms of racial discrimination. 

             

The only remedy to present discrimination is future discrimination.” In other words, supporting “antiracism” actually means supporting racism — discriminating against people based on the color of their skin.

             

“Antiracism” is incredibly destructive to our schools and communities. Its goal is to separate people into racial identity groups and then encourage feelings of shame, guilt, anger, and resentment toward the other groups.

equity*

This word is commonly understood to mean fairness or justice, but it is now used by activists to mean something much more specific: equality of outcomes between different racial groups. When you hear activists demand “equity,” what they’re actually saying is that the basic American value of equality of opportunity — that the rules should apply equally to everyone, regardless of race — is racist, because equality of opportunity doesn’t always produce equality of results. The solution is “equity,” or attempting to achieve equality of results through discrimination. 

social justice*

This phrase is cleverly designed to make radical political views sound non-political and virtuous. You’re not opposed to justice, are you? Because that would make you a supporter of injustice. The phrase itself has no concrete meaning, which is part of why it is so useful. If you hear school officials or teachers advocating “social justice,” it is important to ask them what specifically they mean — and if they believe that anyone who disagrees is an advocate for injustice.

implicit bias*

This is a theory — unsupported by research — that every person is secretly racist, even if that person doesn’t feel racist, act racist, or believe in treating people differently based on race. A new trend in schools is administering an “Implicit Bias Test” where students are asked to quickly associate negative or positive words with pictures of people of different races. These discredited “tests” are designed to prove that everyone is racist. They are emotionally manipulative pseudoscience and if your school is using them, you should protest vigorously.

microaggression*

This word is defined by activists as an interaction between people of different races, cultures, or genders in which a member of a “victim group” is subjected to subtle but powerful attack — ones the attacker is unaware he or she is carrying out. Legitimizing the concept of “microaggressions” serves several important political goals for radical activists: It puts everyone in the “oppressor” racial and gender categories on the defensive, since you can be guilty of “aggression” based entirely on someone else’s say-so. And crucially, encouraging kids to think in terms of “microaggressions” encourages them to be emotionally fragile, to embrace a grievance mindset, and to think of themselves as either oppressors or victims. These are all important political-psychological goals of woke activists.

white fragility*

One of the core beliefs of Critical Race Theory is that all white people are racist, whether they think they are or not. But how should activists handle white people who do not believe they are racist? Instead of trying to convince them using facts and evidence, it can be effective to attack their character. That’s where “white fragility” comes in. If a white person denies being racist, or becomes defensive or upset when accused of “privilege” or racism, or rejects any aspect of Critical Race Theory, he or she will be accused of “fragility.” It’s not that they disagree — it’s that they’re too emotionally weak to accept the truth. This is an incredibly cynical way of avoiding a real discussion and simply attacking someone’s character in the hope of putting them on the defensive. 

systemic or structural racism*

Under Critical Race Theory, systemic racism is the only permissible explanation for differences in outcomes between racial groups.

Accusing our entire society of structural racism is part of a strategy that seeks to justify radical, destructive political changes. If everything is racist, then everything must be torn down.

white privilege**

The unearned, mostly unacknowledged social advantage white people have over other racial groups simply because they are white.

trans-la-tion

CRT Terminology

The words we use matter. 

How those words are defined matters.